Books

SUPPORTING STUDENTS EDUCATING COMMUNITY

You can support WLCSRF by purchasing a book written by the scholarship founder, Congressman William “Bill” L. Clay, Sr. (Retired). Each book explores important questions and defining battles surrounding U.S. economics, politics and social system. They tell of past challenges overcome and those yet resolved.

WLCSRF Books

US Presidents: The Good, The Bad, The Ugly Pimples, Warts and All
Hundreds of politicians and journalists have written books to evaluate or critique United State
Presidents. However, what has not been uncovered in full capacity is an accurate recount of the
presidents’ behavior specifically toward black American citizens - until Retired Congressman William L.
Clay gave readers this very opportunity in his newest work U.S. Presidents: The Good, The Bad, The Ugly
Pimples, Warts and All. Clay gives an honest, black perspective on the direct effect various presidents’
leadership had on the interests and agendas of African Americans – especially related to economic and
educational advancement of black people. From Franklin D. Roosevelt, to John F. Kennedy, readers will
see the direct correlation of the work done in Oval Office and its impact held on the common citizen.
The impoverishments of minorities often were at the hand of the serving president, and in this book,
Clay reveals specifically why and how several presidents were ultimately responsible.


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To Kill or Not to Kill
Capital Punishment continues to promote heavy controversy in the United States. With nearly a 60/40
split throughout the country in regard to legality, it unequivocally divides our nation, with no evidence
of compromise in the near future. However, when considering the majority of Americans profess belief
in Christianity, “the views of the American public concerning capital punishment reflect a basic paradox
in religious values” (Clay). In To Kill or Not to Kill, Retired United States Congressman William L. Clay Sr.
explores this paradox, while also revealing the moral, racial, and economic injustices that the death
penalty perpetuates. Gwen Giles, former St. Louis city assessor and civil rights activist, stated Clay’s
writings will “undoubtedly raise questions in the minds of those who believe in the right and duty of the
state to levy the ultimate punishment.” Clay proposes a solution to the irony of this question: Why is it
necessary to kill people, who kill people, to teach people who kill people that killing people is wrong?


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Just Permanent Interests
Just Permanent Interests offers crucial insight to the numerous tribulations elected officials of African
American descent will encounter as professional politicians. Author William L. Clay Sr. prioritizes
dispelling misconceived notions of what it means to be African American in public office, and
furthermore, recounts the importance of their roles in American history. Documenting noteworthy
moments in political history from 1870 to the 1990’s, Clay reminds readers of the contributions made by
black politicians beneficial to every American, and reveals how the system continually works to both
empower and suppress their continued success. As a seasoned political professional with over thirty
years in elected office, Clay does not write from speculation, but verifiable personal experience (Clay).
With that experience came absolute clarity to the Congressional Black Caucus motto: black people have
no permanent friends, no permanent enemies, just permanent interests.


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Power of Principled Politics
Retired Congressman William L. Clay Sr.’s career as a United State Representative spanned the election
of six United State Presidents – beginning with President Richard Nixon in 1969 and ending with
President Bill Clinton in 2001. Power of Principled Politics is a reflection of serving in public office during
some of the most monumental moments in the nation’s history– the height of the civil rights
movement, multiple assassination attempts, and an endless array of scandals generated by corruption,
lies and greed. As written in the author’s notes, “ in the last three decades of the 20 th century, honest,
compassionate, effective government at all levels rarely existed.” The events of the last three decades
are directly responsible for the state of our nation today – which makes Clay’s story one of the most
significant reads for this generation of Americans.


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A Political Voice at the Grass Roots
A Political Voice at the Grass Roots recounts the legacy of William L Clay Sr.’s ongoing fight for civil rights
during the 1950’s – 1970’s for St. Louisans, an era where politics were inarguably unequal for minorities
and the poor. His endeavor for the power to bring change caused a multitude of conflict, controversy,
and confrontation – all of which Clay defeated while not dishonoring his morality. Through this documentation, current and future leaders have the opportunity to grasp a clearer understanding of
racially charged history, and how to best serve the citizens who elect them to combat it. As noted in the
foreword by Robert R. Archibald , this country continues “…to labor under the burden of racism, elitism,
and inequality,” but Clay’s story gives readers the hope, knowledge, and power to continue to fight
back.


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Clarence Thomas: A Black Knight in Tainted Armor
African Americans elected into public office often choose to use their influence to advocate for the
rights and advancement of minorities and the disadvantaged. Unfortunately, every black official does
not share this exact same conviction – even to the point of sabotaging the work of others to fulfill
crooked agendas. From attacking affirmative action to criticizing the work of esteemed civil rights
activists before him, Justice Clarence Thomas has made clear his stance as a black man without any
concern for black agendas. Clarence Thomas: A Black Knight in Tainted Armor documents numerous
instances Thomas eliminated hope and opportunity for the less fortunate in society – many of which are
people of color. Retired Congressman William L. Clay is relentless in exposing Thomas’ actions of
destruction, and his principles which go completely against the preservation of black people.


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The Jefferson Bank Confrontation
Among the many racial injustices of the 1960s in St. Louis, MO is the Jefferson Bank Protest of 1963. The
confrontation existed due to qualified black applicants facing unjust denial for job opportunity, with no
other logical explanation other than the color of their skin. The irony of the protest was the media’s
ludicrous attempt to promote St. Louis as a city free of racial tension, which of course was proved false
not only by Jefferson Bank, but the actual economic and social state of black St. Louis citizens.
Thankfully, the imprisonment of nineteen civil right fighters was not futile, as thousands of unemployed
blacks found work as a result. As an active participant, author William L. Clay gives an accurate recount
not only of this moment in history, but “…an insight into the dynamics of the struggle for economic
equity and political parity, …reasons for the demonstrations,” and a reflection “…on the crisis in
employment faced by blacks” (Clay).


Books



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